Notizie QRZ

DUO 8 15-20 SF is a fullsize antenna for 14 MHz and 21 MHz. No traps or adapting systems where used to obtain fantastic performances and the best bandwidth. The feed is direct trought 2 separate 50 Ohm cables.

Suitable fot lift towers with side up to: 130 cm / 4.2 ft

Specification
Gain: 14.5 dBi (15m) / 13.0 dBi (20m) *
F/B ratio: 20.0 dB (15m) / 20.0 dB (20m)
SWR: best of 1:1.5 (15m) / 1:1.5 (20m)
Active elements: 4 (15m) / 4 (20m)
Longest element: 11,00 m / 36.1 ft
Boom lenght: 10,00 m / 32.8 ft

For more informations please contact us info@momobeam.com

DUO 8 15-20 SF is a fullsize antenna for 14 MHz and 21 MHz. No traps or adapting systems where used to obtain fantastic performances and the best bandwidth. The feed is direct trought 2 separate 50 Ohm cables.

Specification
Gain: 14.5 dBi (15m) / 13.0 dBi (20m) *
F/B ratio: 20.0 dB (15m) / 20.0 dB (20m)
SWR: best of 1:1.5 (15m) / 1:1.5 (20m)
Active elements: 4 (15m) / 4 (20m)
Longest element: 11,00 m / 36.1 ft
Boom lenght: 10,00 m / 32.8 ft
Feed: 2 separate 50 Ohm cables (baluns 1:1 not included)
Hardware: inox
Wind area: 0.99 m² / 10.67 sq. ft
Wind load at 130Km/h: 807 N
Wind survival**: 130 Km/h – (higher on request)surface: 0.9 mq
Turning radius: 740 cm / 24.28 ft
Power handling: 10 KW
Suitable for towers lift with side: 130 cm / 4.2 ft
Weight: 52.0 Kg / 114 lb
Mast size: 50/60 mm (upper on request)

In addition:
Simplified installation instructions
Separate hardware elements
Detailed manual

* Calculated at 20m from the ground

**Wind survival is the maximum wind speed at which there is no permanent deformation of the antenna

https://www.momobeam.eu

Equipment

App – Mobile

Review

Software

SDRuno 1.21 Released

SDRuno 1.21 Released

November 13, 2017
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SDRuno release 1.21 has now been released. This release of SDRuno contains the following amendments and bug fixes: 1. Restored VFO button for centring… Read more

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The Amateur Radio clubs at National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) centers around the US have invited the Amateur Radio community to join the NASA On The Air (NOTA) special event. NOTA gets under way in December 2017 and continues through December 2018. In addition to being the agency’s 60th anniversary, 2018 will mark 50 years since NASA orbited the first human around the moon, and 20 years since the first elements of the International Space Station (ISS) were launched into low-Earth orbit.

 

Starting on Monday, December 11, 2017 (UTC), Amateur Radio club stations at various NASA centers and facilities will be on the air with special event operations to celebrate these monumental achievements, as well as current milestones. Some clubs will offer commemorative QSL cards, and a special certificate will be available indicating the number of NASA club stations worked on various bands and modes.

 

“We plan to have a web-based system for you to check your points total and download a printable certificate at the end of the event in December 2018,” the NASA announcement said. “Points will be awarded for each center worked on each band and mode (phone, CW, digital, and ‘space’ modes — satellites, meteor scatter, EME, ISS APRS).” That would, of course, include contacts with any of the Amateur Radio stations on the ISS.

 

Key anniversaries during NOTA include the 45th anniversary of Apollo 17 on December 11, 2017, which kicks off the event; NASA’s founding on July 29, 1958; the 20th anniversary of the ISS first element launch on November 20, 1998; the 20th anniversary of the ISS Node 1 Launch on December 4, 1998, and the 50th anniversary of Apollo 8 — launched on December 21, 1968, and returned on December 27 — marking the end of the event.

 

Ham radio clubs at various NASA facilities will sponsor their own special events to commemorate and celebrate specific events.

 

“We hope to be on the air for casual contacts and contests as well. All contacts with NASA club stations will count toward your total,” the announcement said. “QSL cards can be requested from each club you work and details will be on the individual QRZ.com profile page for each club call sign.”

 

Center/Facility

 

Designator

 

Call Sign

 

State

 

Ames Research Center

 

ARC

 

NA6MF

 

California

 

Armstrong Flight Research Center

 

AFRC

 

NA6SA

 

California

 

Glenn Research Center

 

GRC

 

NA8SA

 

Ohio

 

Goddard Space Flight Center

 

GSFC

 

WA3NAN

 

Maryland

 

International Space Station

 

ISS

 

NA1SS, etc.

 

Earth orbit

 

Jet Propulsion Laboratory

 

JPL

 

W6VIO

 

California

 

Johnson Space Center

 

JSC

 

W5RRR

 

Texas

 

Kennedy Space Center

 

KSC

 

N1KSC

 

Florida

 

Langley Research Center

 

LARC

 

KG4NJA

 

Virginia

 

Marshall Space Flight Center

 

MSFC

 

NN4SA

 

Alabama

 

Stennis Space Center

 

SSC

 

TBD

 

Mississippi

 

Wallops Fight Facility

 

WFF

 

W4WFF

 

Virginia

 

White Sands Complex

 

WSC

 

N5BL

 

New Mexico

 

More information is on the NASA On The Air website. Participating Amateur Radio clubs, and the NASA On The Air (NOTA) event are independent of — and not officially sponsored by — NASA. — Thanks to Rob Suggs, KB5EZ, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Amateur Radio Club (NN4SA), and Kevin Zari, KK4YEL, NASA Kennedy Space Center Amateur Radio Club (N1KSC).

Source:ARRL

VHF

Review

Antenna

Digital Modes

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Satellite signals heard over the weekend did not come from a missing Argentine Navy submarine San Juan that went missing on November 15, dashing hopes that the vessel could be located. The submarine had reported a malfunction, had surfaced, and was headed back to its base when the Navy lost contact with it. The sub, built in Germany in the 1980s, carries a crew of 44.

Vessels from Argentina, the US, Great Britain, Chile, and Brazil have joined other vessels and aircraft looking for the submarine.

A Naval commander told media today that the submarine had surfaced and reported “an electrical problem” before it disappeared some 270 miles off the South American coast on its return to its base at Mar del Plata.

Over the weekend, Argentina’s Defense Ministry reported receiving seven “failed satellite calls” that officials thought might be coming from the missing submarine. No contact was made, and no transmissions occurred. Poor weather has complicated the search.

Over the weekend, IARU Region 2 News Editor Joaquín Solana, XE1R, issued a list of marine frequencies, suggesting that radio amateurs and SWLs listen for any signals that could be related to the missing San Juan. Frequencies are 2,065.0 kHz; 2,182.0 kHz; 3,023.0 kHz; 3,860.6 kHz; 4,125.0 kHz; 4,143.6 kHz; 6,218.6 kHz, and 8,528.0 kHz on HF, as well as 42.395 MHz, 43.040 MHz, and 84.470 MHz. The MF emergency frequencies of 416 kHz, 437 kHz, and 500 kHz also were suggested.

Source:ARRL

Antenna

VHF

Equipment

Yaesu FT DX 3000

Yaesu FT DX 3000

December 30, 2014
No comments

The Yaesu FT DX 3000 – Building on the YAESU FT DX Heritage The FT DX 3000 is member of the long line of top performing YAESU FT DX Series of tr… Read more

CW TOUCH PADDLES

CW TOUCH PADDLES

November 09, 2015
No comments

Product Features and use:   ·           Electronic keyer paddles using electrostatic touch paddle technology   ·       Because there are no moving par… Read more

Digital Modes

Review

 

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The IRN (International Radio Network) is a VoIP/RoIP system using Teamspeak 3 (TS3) that allows radio users to TX/RX using RF around the World using  different devices (Mobile Phones, Tablets, Computers etc) for free.

The system also allows users to create private talkgroups for point to point or private group QSO’s.
If you would like to add your link, repeater or hub to the IRN system, please use the contact us section to drop us a line.
TS3 is available on Apple, Android, PC, Mac and Linux. The IRN has it’s own private server allowing hundreds of connections at once. There are different talkgroups (channels) within that allow users full RX/TX capabilities across different radio networks and systems from across the globe.
To make it more interesting, you can use PTT-enabled smartphones like the ones listed below. Most of the hams use PTT-enabled phones, so they can use the IRN with the same style as they use a handheld radio. The IRN talk groups can be accessed via GPRS / 3G / 4G / Wifi or RF (depending on the repeaters).

Please note: This system is free to use for both non-licensed* & licensed hams. Live ham-radio repeaters can only be accessed by licensed hams.

*Non-licensed users must apply for membership of IRN in order to have a callsign generated for them (Don’t worry, it’s also free).

The following devices have a dedicated PTT button that will make your experience even better when using the IRN.

SOFTWARE INSTALATION – HOW TO CONFIGURE IRN ON YOUR EQUIPMENT

Please click on the link below to download the PDF file for your device.
These PDF files can be downloaded so that you can set up your device with the IRN server details.
Please note, that once you have signed into the server, an admin will need to verify you and assign you voice rights. This will only be done once you are verified.
In case of any issues, we will contact you via email (please supply one directly if you do not have one listed on QRZ).
For non-licensed users, please follow the link on the home page to IRN and join via them so that you can have access to the server.

Download
How to install on Android
This is a PDF file with step by step instructions on how to download and install Teamspeak 3 and set it up on the IRN server.
How to set up Teamspeak 3 Android.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [750.1 KB]
Download
How to install on iOs (Apple)
This is a PDF file with step by step instructions on how to download and install Teamspeak 3 and set it up on the IRN server.
How to set up Teamspeak 3 Iphone.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [1’023.8 KB]
Download
How to install on Windows
This is a PDF file with step by step instructions on how to download and install Teamspeak 3 and set it up on the IRN server.
How to set up Teamspeak 3 Windows PC.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [860.1 KB]
Download
How to use the IRN Server once you are connected.
This PDF gives you some instructions on some of the basic features that are available on the IRN.
There are lots of things not included on here, but we’d recommend that new users give it a read through to help explain what different things mean.
IRN – How to use the IRN Server.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [546.0 KB]
Download
T&C’s – IRN usage guidelines for all users.
Whilst most of what we do is common sense, we do have a set of guidelines that are there to make the system both fairer and safer for everyone to use. Please have a read prior to using our system.
IRN TC’s.pdf
Adobe Acrobat document [353.4 KB]


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Antenna

E-Z-O Antenna

E-Z-O Antenna

June 09, 2016
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A Successful Alternative to the Cubical Quad he revolutionary antenna you see pictured, the E-Z-O, was created by N8PPQ as the result of his efforts t… Read more

VHF

Equipment

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NEW FOR 2018!

Following on from our successful LFA-Q compact quads, we are adding a more traditional looking quad to our range which boasts two of the features of the LFA-Q. It is a Rigid quad using tubes rather than wires (which enhances gain) and uses twin booms top and bottom to complete a very sturdy package. The antenna looks more like a traditional quad too being very square in appearance although the height of the quad elements are the same, just the element width changes in length.

The example pictured is for 50MHz and has a boom length of just 53cms yet packs a mighty punch with 7.6dBi forward gain and 18dB F/B and like all G0KSC designed antennas has a direct 50Ohm feed so no matching device losses or noise and no input power limit!

This first-of-breed Quads is installed at G0KSC for testing and a full range down to 21MHz will be applied to the range for the coming year.

Keep an eye on the InnovAntennas Facebook page and website for updates or register your interest at sales@innovantennas.com

www.innovantennas.com

Equipment

KC901H Analyzer

KC901H Analyzer

December 19, 2014
No comments

Main Features – Transmission test (tuning  diplexer and filter, testing amplifier and inspecting the directivity of antennas) – Reflection… Read more

Review

VHF

Digital Modes

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DXtreme Software™ has released a new version of its popular logging program for radio monitoring enthusiasts: DXtreme Monitor Log 11.
Monitor Log 11 lets listeners and DXers log the stations they’ve heard using advanced
features that can enhance their monitoring experience.

Finding Broadcast Stations to Monitor

The Schedule Checker™ lets users import schedules from Aoki, EiBi, and FCC AM
web sites and display schedule data according to the filter criteria they specify. A list
box lets users switch between schedule types, and depending on the schedule type
selected, users can filter schedule information by band, frequency, station, country,
city, state, time of day, language, antenna direction, and target area.
When the What’s On Now? function is activated, the schedule refreshes automatically at the top of each hour for Aoki and EiBi schedules.

For each schedule item, Schedule Checker queries the Monitor Log 11 database to
let users know – through user-defined, foreground and background display colors –
whether they need to monitor a station for a brand-new or verified country. Schedule
Checker also displays bearing and distance, runs optional Afreet Ham CAP1
propagation predictions, draws optional Afreet DX Atlas2 azimuth plots, tunes
supported radios to schedule frequencies when users double-click schedule items3 4 5,and starts log entries for scheduled stations monitored.

Finding Amateur Radio Stations to Monitor
Monitor Log 11 integrates with optional Afreet Band Master6
to let users see, on its
graphical interface, where hams are operating. Monitor Log 11 supplies Band Master
with an Entity Needed List based on the user’s Monitor Log database, making it
possible for Band Master to indicate the stations whose entities (countries) users
need to monitor. When invoking Band Master, users can select an Entity Needed List
for all bands or individually for the 160- through 6-Meter bands.

Finding Utility Stations to Monitor

A Links menu provides convenient access to user-specified blogs and web sites that
can inform users as to where utility and other stations may be operating.
Logging Stations
Monitor Log 11 lets users log all kinds of stations — radio stations, television stations,
broadcast stations, Amateur Radio stations, utility stations, military stations, and more!

And it lets them log stations across the radio spectrum — from long wave, to medium
wave, to short wave, and beyond.
The Last Log Entries Grid on the Monitor Log window shows up to 5000 of the most
recent log entries added. Its records can be sorted, and double-clicking records
displays detailed data on the Monitor Log window. Users can resize the grid columns
and scroll horizontally to columns that do not appear initially. And because the names of stations and NASWA countries can be quite long, users can also display a larger, resizable Last Log Entries window. A Properties window lets users change the
order of columns, the number of log entries to display, and the font and color attributesof grids and other program components, such as the Content Editor for describing the content monitored, the Script Editor for creating and editing scripts, the Direct Tuneinterface for tuning radios, and the Comments tab for typing ad hoc comments.

Reporting Reception
Users can create customized paper and e-mail reception reports for sending to
stations plus club report entries for reporting catches to clubs and magazines.
When users add or display a log entry, Monitor Log 11 prepares a post announcing
their DX catch and displays it on the Social Media Post tab. From there, users can
drag the post to their favorite social media web sites to share their catch with others.
Using the Script Editor window, users can create and edit scripts that format
reception reports, eReports, and social media posts to their liking. The software
prompts users to select the script they want to use. Dozens of scripts come with
Monitor Log 11.
Users can also print SWL and Address labels on industry-standard label stock, and
send eQSL requests to hams automatically through the popular www.eQSL.cc site.
Imaging
Improv Imaging™ lets users associate ad hoc images with log entries using Capture,
Scan, and Clipboard functions. Captures of stations received on digital applications,
waterfall displays, facsimile and Amateur TV pictures are popular. The Improv
Imaging tab and Application let users view images anytime, and an Improv Image
Explorer lets them peruse their entire collection and display associated log entries.
QSL Imaging™ functions the same as Improv Imaging, but specializes in associating
QSL cards and eQSLs with log entries.
Other Features
Rig Control — Retrieves the frequency and mode from supported radios and permits
tuning from the Schedule Checker and Direct Tune interface. Rig control is provided
through integration with Afreet Omni-Rig and the SDR applications listed on our web
site, currently HDSDR4
(High Definition Software Defined Radio) and SDR Console 5.
Audio Archiving — An embedded Audio facility lets users maintain an audio archive
of stations heard.
Reporting — Produces Performance, Stations, and Log Entry reports that track the
performance and progress of the user’s monitoring station. The software lets users
FTP those reports to user-provided Web space for remote access. Some reports
integrate with Afreet DX Atlas to generate pin maps.
Documentation — Context-sensitive Procedural Help, Field Help, and Microhelp
are accessible per window to provide instructions quickly. A web-based Information
Center is accessible from the Help menu for late-breaking assistance, and Installation
Instructions and a Getting Started Guide are delivered in PDF format with the software.

Operating Systems, Pricing, Contact Information
DXtreme Monitor Log 11 runs in 32- and 64-bit versions of Microsoft® Windows® 10,8.1, 8, 7, Vista®, and XP. It retails for $89.99 USD worldwide for electronic distribution.

Pricing for CD versions and upgrading users is available on our Web site. All prices
include product support by Internet e-mail. For more information, visit www.dxtreme.com
or contact Bob Raymond at bobraymond@dxtreme.com.
1 — Licenses for Afreet Ham CAP and Omni-Rig are required to use Ham CAP.
2 — A license for Afreet DX Atlas is required to perform plots and create pin reports.
3 — A license for Afreet Omni-Rig is required to use rig control with radios supported by Omni-Rig.
4 — Can be used for rig control. HDSDR is owned by Mario Taeubel. Refer to http://www.hdsdr.de/index.html for more information.
5 — Can be used for rig control. SDR Console is owned by Simon Brown, G4ELI. Refer to http://www.sdr-radio.com for more information.
6 — A license for Afreet Band Master is required to use Band Maste

Equipment

ICOM IC-DPR30

ICOM IC-DPR30

September 21, 2016
No comments

ICOM IC-DPR30 Smallest and lightest ever ※ 1 , built-in antenna, Bluetooth ® support. New release of the transceiver IC-DPR30 that can be used to styl… Read more

Antenna

Review

 

 

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In part one of our reports from Hamfest 2017 we have a sneak preview of the Icom IC-7610 and IC-R8600 rigs. We meet the new owners of PW Magazine, and Pete tries his hand at the RSGB on-line exam. There’s also an update on the Society’s EMC Committee’s findings. Bob finds his way back to New Broadcasting House in London where the Director General discovers he has amateurs working for the Corporation. Nevertheless, Lord Hall broadcasts from the shack of the newly resurrected club station G8BBC. And, Laurie Margolis G3UML recounts an historic QSO he had from the early 1980s.

Equipment

New ! Yaesu FT-410

New ! Yaesu FT-410

August 27, 2015
No comments

YAESU FT-410 features General   Rx Frequency Range: 30 kHz – 30 MHz (operating) 160 – 10 m (specified performance, Amateur bands only) Tx Frequency Ra… Read more

Review

VHF

News

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“The Sun’s activity picks up this week with several pockets of fast wind expected to spark aurora at high latitudes. A slight chance for mid-latitude aurora also is expected later in the week. A new active regionhas also rotated into view this week and has given us a much needed boost in solar flux. Amateur radio operators and emergency responders should enjoy improved communications over HF radio for the next two weeks. Learn the details of this new solar activity and how the Sun will affect you this week.”


Equipment

Xiegu X108G

Xiegu X108G

November 19, 2015
No comments

X108G Outdoor is X108’s upgraded version, It is a compact single conversion HF transceiver covering 0.5 to 30 MHz. Special optimized the Receive Chann… Read more

VHF

Review

Digital Modes

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Vertical or dipole? Which is better for you? Antenna modeling software (EZNEC+) helps answer the question! 

VHF

Equipment

App – Mobile

Review

Antenna

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Radio amateurs in Colombia have been granted new allocations at 60, 630, and 2200 meters. The new allocations resulted from the efforts of the Liga Colombiana de Radioaficionados (LCRA) — with the support of its “strategic partner” Liga Radio Bogotá (LRB). Access to the new bands will be effective when the Colombian Communications Ministry grants the privileges by administrative act. The new allocations are 135.7-137.8 kHz (2200 meters); 472-479 kHz (630 meters); and 5,351.5-5,366.5 kHz (60 meters).

In Germany, radio amateurs there now have a 60-meter band plus an extended 6-meter band, the Deutscher Amateur Radio Club (DARC) reports. Amateur radio has been allocated the band 5,351.5-5,366.5 kHz at a maximum power of 15 W EIRP on a secondary basis. This is in accordance with the allocation agreed upon at World Radiocommunication Conference 2015 (WRC 15). In addition, hams now have access to a slightly expanded 6-meter band. The band 50.08-51.0 MHz previously allocated to the amateur radio service on a secondary basis will be expanded to 50.03-51.0 MHz at a maximum 25 W ERP

Source:ARRL

Antenna

VHF

Review

Equipment

Ameritron AL-572

Ameritron AL-572

November 17, 2014
No comments

Ameritrons new class of Near Legal Limit Amplifiers give you nearly full legal SSB power output for 65% of the price of a full legal limit amplifier… Read more

App – Mobile

Ham GeoTool APP

Ham GeoTool APP

November 13, 2015
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A tool all-in-one for the radio amateur in Portugal and Spain created for personal use but at the last JOTA / JOTI, was released at the request of som… Read more

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