reception

All posts tagged reception

AMSAT is urging satellite enthusiasts to get their FoxTelem telemetry software up and running, in anticipation of the launch on November 14 of RadFxSat (Fox-1B). It will carry a Fox-1 style FM U/V repeater with an uplink on 435.250 MHz (67.0 Hz CTCSS) and a downlink on 145.960 MHz. Satellite and experiment telemetry will be downlinked via the DUV subaudible telemetry stream, which can be decoded using FoxTelem.

The first Amateur Radio operator to successfully receive RadFxSat (Fox-1B) telemetry and upload it to the AMSAT server will receive a commemorative 3D printed QSL card.

RadFxSat is scheduled to launch at 0947 UTC on November 14 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. The first transmission from RadFxSat is expected to occur around 1207 UTC. Due to a lack of pre-launch Keplerian elements, it is not known where the satellite will be when it makes its first transmission.

More information on the launch and early orbit phase of RadFxSat are on the AMSAT website. RadFxSat (Fox-1B), which will carry a 435/145 MHz FM transponder, is one of four CubeSats making up the NASA ELaNa XIV mission, riding as secondary payloads aboard the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) mission. JPSS-1 will launch on a Delta II vehicle from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. — Thanks to AMSAT News Service

Source:ARRL

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Acom HF antenna V101

Acom HF antenna V101

April 24, 2015
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  Acom HF antenna V101 FEATURES The V101 – 03AT antenna system consists of the Broadband Inverted Vee Dipole Antenna V101 and the automatic… Read more

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The resurrected 25-MHz signal of time and frequency standard station WWV is now emanating from a circularly polarized turnstile antenna. WWV had used a vertically polarized antenna on 25 MHz in the 1970s. Silent since 1977, the 25-MHz signal returned to the air on an “experimental basis” in April 2014, and it’s been transmitting ever since — initially on a broadband discone until August 2015, when it switched back to a vertical, which it used until the July 7 switch to circular polarization.

“[W]e are broadcasting with 2 kW from a circularly polarized turnstile antenna,” WWV lead electrical engineer Matt Deutch, N0RGT, told ARRL this week. “It is just your standard plain-vanilla turnstile — two horizontal orthogonal dipoles with a quarter-wave phase-shifting coax linking them.”

Deutch has explained that when the 25-MHz transmitter was shut down in 1977, the antenna’s radiating element was “tossed in the bone yard, and a new longer section put on the tower to make it a 15 MHz stand-by antenna,” Deutch recounted. When WWV first reintroduced the 25-MHz broadcast some 37 years later in response to requests, it used a broadband monopole. But, it was later decided to use that antenna for WWV’s 2.5-MHz stand-by transmitter and to rebuild the 25-MHz antenna. The old radiating section was retrieved and the antenna rebuilt, so that it looked like what was being used in 1977.

 

Deutch said it’s hoped that the latest antenna change to circular polarization might be helpful to anyone studying propagation during next month’s total solar eclipse, which will be visible across the US. “My effort right now is focused on getting the word out, just to make people are aware that [the 25-MHz signal] is available, if it can be useful to them.”

Before the change, Deutch said WWV had received reports on the 25 MHz signal from across the Atlantic. The 25 MHz broadcast includes the same information transmitted on all other WWV frequencies and at the same level of accuracy.

Located in Fort Collins, Colorado, WWV is operated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). WWV has invited listeners’ comments and reports on its 25-MHz signal.

Source:ARRL

Antenna

Discone Antenna

Discone Antenna

December 19, 2014
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    A discone antenna is a version of a biconical antenna in which one of the cones is replaced by a disc. It is usually mounted vertically, with… Read more

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Heil Pro 7

Heil Pro 7

December 22, 2014
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The Heil Pro 7 offers a feature set that compliments the Heil Sound standard for headset design. Unlike copies of various aviation type headsets, the… Read more

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An Amateur Radio special event on December 11 will commemorate the 95th anniversary of the first transatlantic shortwave reception between Greenwich, Connecticut, and Scotland. A school near the original site is hosting the event. ARRL, the Radio Society of Great Britain (RSGB), and the Radio Club of America (RCA), are partnering in sponsoring the activity. The Greenwich Historical Society will also participate.

On December 11, 1921, reception in Ardrossan, Scotland, of a radio signal transmitted from an RCA test station  — located in a small shack on the property of Minton Cronkhite, 1BCG, on the corner of Clapboard Ridge Road and North Street in Greenwich — helped to usher in the age of global communication. The special event will use N1BCG, the call sign of Clark Burgard of Greenwich, who obtained that call sign to commemorate this bit of radio history. Burgard was instrumental in making arrangements for the event.

The N1BCG special event will begin on Sunday, December 11, at 1200 and conclude at 0300 UTC on December 12. It will include an attempt at a two-way contact between N1BCG and GB2ZE, operated by Jason O’Neill, GM7VSB, in Ardrossan.

Reception in Scotland of the 1BCG signal was part of the second series of ARRL transatlantic tests. For the receiving end, the ARRL Board had selected a receiver designed by Paul Godley, 2ZE, and Godley traveled to the UK to oversee that end of the circuit. Joining Godley in a field in Ardrossan, southwest of Glasgow, was Marconi Company District Inspector D.E. Pearson. As the QST article, “The Transatlantic Tests” (QST Dec. 2014) by Michael Marinaro, WN1M, recounted, “The two attempted to keep out of the driving wind and rain by sheltering themselves — and their equipment — in a tent. This rough listening post was comprised of a (superheterodyne and regenerative) receiver, a 1,300-foot Beverage antenna suspended 12 feet above ground, batteries, and auxiliary equipment.”

 

n1bcg-qslOn the morning of December 10, CW signals of 1BCG, which had been designed and constructed by Radio Club of America members — were solidly copied on 230 to 235 meters (about 1.3 MHz). They were the only signals heard that morning in Ardrossan. By the end of the test, eight spark and 18 CW stations had been heard as well.

N1BCG operation will be on AM on 75 and 40 meters; CW and SSB on 40 meters, CW on 30 meters, and CW and SSB on 20 and 17 meters.

Approximate frequencies are 3.880 (AM), 7.290 (AM), 7.235 (SSB), 7040 (CW), 10.112 (CW), 14.280 (SSB), 14.040 (CW), 18.125 (SSB), and 18.088 MHz CW. 

Source:ARRL

Equipment

YouKits HB1B upgrade

YouKits HB1B upgrade

January 06, 2015
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  “RadioSet-GO, your source for unique, trail friendly QRP radio designs; simple, efficient, portable, and attractive all-in-one low power… Read more

YAESU FT-8900R

YAESU FT-8900R

September 30, 2014
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YAESU FT-8900R 29/50/144/430 MHz FM Transceiver The FT-8900R is a ruggedly-built, high quality Quad Band FM transceiver providing 50 Watts of power ou… Read more

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