amsat

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AMSAT is urging satellite enthusiasts to get their FoxTelem telemetry software up and running, in anticipation of the launch on November 14 of RadFxSat (Fox-1B). It will carry a Fox-1 style FM U/V repeater with an uplink on 435.250 MHz (67.0 Hz CTCSS) and a downlink on 145.960 MHz. Satellite and experiment telemetry will be downlinked via the DUV subaudible telemetry stream, which can be decoded using FoxTelem.

The first Amateur Radio operator to successfully receive RadFxSat (Fox-1B) telemetry and upload it to the AMSAT server will receive a commemorative 3D printed QSL card.

RadFxSat is scheduled to launch at 0947 UTC on November 14 from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. The first transmission from RadFxSat is expected to occur around 1207 UTC. Due to a lack of pre-launch Keplerian elements, it is not known where the satellite will be when it makes its first transmission.

More information on the launch and early orbit phase of RadFxSat are on the AMSAT website. RadFxSat (Fox-1B), which will carry a 435/145 MHz FM transponder, is one of four CubeSats making up the NASA ELaNa XIV mission, riding as secondary payloads aboard the Joint Polar Satellite System-1 (JPSS-1) mission. JPSS-1 will launch on a Delta II vehicle from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California. — Thanks to AMSAT News Service

Source:ARRL

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Antenna

Acom HF antenna V101

Acom HF antenna V101

April 24, 2015
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  Acom HF antenna V101 FEATURES The V101 – 03AT antenna system consists of the Broadband Inverted Vee Dipole Antenna V101 and the automatic… Read more

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The launch of the Delta II vehicle carrying RadFxSat (Fox-1B) and other payloads has been delayed, due to a faulty battery on the booster, United Launch Alliance (ULA) announced on November 6. The launch now is scheduled for no earlier than Tuesday, November 14. RadFxSat is one of four CubeSats making up the NASA ELaNa XIV mission, riding as secondary payloads aboard the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS)-1 mission, which will launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.

RadFxSat is a partnership with Vanderbilt University’s Institute for Space and Defense Electronics (ISDE) and hosts four payloads for the study of radiation effects on commercial off-the-shelf components. It will carry a Fox-1 style FM U/V repeater with an uplink on 435.250 MHz (67.0 Hz CTCSS) and a downlink on 145.960 MHz. Satellite and experiment telemetry will be downlinked via the DUV subaudible telemetry stream, which can be decoded using FoxTelem software.

AMSAT Vice-President Engineering, Jerry Buxton, N0JY, said RadFxSat/Fox-1B will automatically come up in beacon mode, transmitting a beacon and voice ID (“RadFxSat Safe Mode”) every 2 minutes, starting about 50 minutes after deployment. He said AMSAT command stations will want to see voltage and current data to determine that the spacecraft is healthy and to conduct various tests before opening it up for general use.

Telemetry should begin about 55 minutes after deployment. “[F]or the next 72-96 hours at least, as we look for successful startup, watch the general health and function as the satellite begins to acclimate to space, and perform the on orbit checkout,” Buxton said. Ground stations are invited to continue uploading received telemetry for the life of the satellite.

Those using FoxTelem to capture telemetry are asked to check “Upload to Server” in the software’s settings and make sure that ground station parameters are provided. “You can help AMSAT and everyone waiting to get on the air with RadFxSat tremendously, by capturing RadFxSat telemetry,” Buxton said.

Patience and Good Manners Urged

In the initial beacon mode, the transmitter is limited to 10 seconds “on” time, followed by a 2-minute “off” cycle. “If we are seeing good data from user telemetry data, it is likely when it comes over the US for the first good pass, we will command it from beacon mode to normal safe mode, which then puts RadFxSat in full, but still safe mode, operation and transmits a full two frames of telemetry,” Buxton said.

Buxton called on the satellite community to be “polite and patient” as RadFxSat is commissioned.

“The on-orbit check-out procedure is similar to Fox-1A/AO-85 and could be completed in as little as a few days, if we have the cooperation of the users,” he said. “It is very important — not to mention just plain good amateur operating practice — to refrain from using the transponder uplink, so we can do the on-orbit tests, including when we turn on transponder mode for testing. I can’t stress enough, the importance of this cooperation, not just for us but for all users, simply having a little patience so we can conduct the tests as quickly and accurately as possible.” 

Buxton said AMSAT would “make it broadly known” when the transponder is available for general use. “If you hear someone on the transponder, please don’t assume that it is open for general use,” he said. “Check the AMSAT website, Facebook, Twitter, to be sure you’re not accidentally jumping in and unwittingly interfering with the commissioning process.” — Thanks to AMSAT News Service 

Source:ARRL

Antenna

FX771 MetroPWR Overview

FX771 MetroPWR Overview

September 14, 2017
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 Technical Features METER METROPWR FX771  Coverage 1.8/55 MHz 160/6mt + VHF/UHF (optional)  Measure Power AVG, PeP, dBm, R, Z, X , SWR, ReturnLoss  Po… Read more

Equipment

Palstar SP30H

Palstar SP30H

October 09, 2014
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The Palstar SP30H ultimate communications speaker is a custom engineered speaker designed to match the sonic characteristics of the human voice. The… Read more

Digital Modes

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Videos of the presentations given at the AMSAT-UK International Space Colloquium, which was held as part of the RSGB Convention in Milton Keynes, October 14-15, are being made available on YouTube.

The first of the videos is ‘An introduction to Amateur satellites’ by David Johnson G4DPZ and Carlos Eavis G3VHF.

The PDF of the slides is here.

Other presentations are expected to be uploaded in the coming days.

PDF Slides of ‘An introduction to Amateur satellites’
https://ukamsat.files.wordpress.com/2017/10/beginners-guide-to-amateur-satellites-by-dave-johnson-g4dpz.pdf

AMSAT-UK videos on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/user/AMSATUK/videos

Our thanks to the British Amateur Television Club and Wouter Weggelaar PA3WEG for their work in recording, editing and uploading these videos.

Source:AMSAT-UK

Antenna

VHF

TYT TH-9000D – VHF

TYT TH-9000D – VHF

March 29, 2016
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The TYT TH-9000 is the Amateur compliant transceiver, with commercial grade features.   This radio can be used on the BC Forest Logging Roads, and can… Read more

Yaesu FT 550L

Yaesu FT 550L

March 15, 2015
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  Version 2.00 NEW FEATURES Updated the Memory Book to include eight customizable Memory Groups Updated Scan Band selection “ALL BAND” scans both… Read more

App – Mobile

Top 5 Ham Radio App

Top 5 Ham Radio App

September 11, 2016
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If you’re a member of ARRL, the national association for Amateur Radio, install this app and have QST, the ARRL membership journal, delivered to… Read more

Review

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AMSAT Vice President Engineering Jerry Buxton, N0JY, on August 15 delivered RadFxSat (Fox-1B) CubeSat, built in partnership with Vanderbilt University to Cal Poly University. RadFsSat/Fox-1B was successfully integrated into the P-POD CubeSat deployment container on August 16 along with its pod-mates, Makersat-0 and EagleSat.

Launch qualification vibration testing of the integrated P-POD was completed on August 17. The P-POD will next be mounted on the ULA Delta II rocket for launch no earlier than October 12.

“Many thanks to the Cal Poly, Tyvak, and NASA personnel who we performed the integration with, to the Makersat-0 and EagleSat team members, and to my west coast AMSAT CubeSat wing man Al Vasso for a successful and fun day!” Buxton said afterward.

Uplink for Fox-1B is 435.250 MHz FM (67.0 Hz CTCSS); Downlink is 145.960 MHz FM (with subaudible slow speed telemetry data); 145.960 MHz 9600 baud FSK data— Thanks to AMSAT News Service via Jerry Buxton, N0JY

SOURCE:ARRL

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It’s time to nominate candidates for the upcoming AMSAT-NA Board of Directors election. Four directors’ terms expire this year — Barry Baines, WD4ASW; Jerry Buxton, N0JY; Drew Glasbrenner, KO4MA, and Bob McGwier, N4HY. In addition, up to two Alternates may be elected for 1-year terms.

A valid nomination requires either one member society or five current members in good standing to nominate an AMSAT-NA member for Director.

Mail written nominations, consisting of the nominee’s name and call sign, and the nominating individual’s names, call signs, and individual signatures to AMSAT-NA, 10605 Concord St #304, Kensington, MD 20895-2526.

Submitting written nominations by mail is the preferred method, but notice of intent to nominate an AMSAT member may be delivered by electronic means — e-mail, fax, or electronic image of a petition. E-mail electronic petitions to martha@amsat.org or fax them to (301)822-4371. Petitions must arrive no later than June 15, 2017, at the AMSAT-NA office.

Anything other than a traditional written petition must be backed up by a verifying written petition, received at the AMSAT-NA office within 7 days of the June 15 close of nominations. Solely electronic submissions are invalid under AMSAT-NA bylaws. — Thanks to AMSAT News Service via Paul Stoetzer, N8HM

Source:ARRL

Equipment

Yaesu SP-9000 Speakers

Yaesu SP-9000 Speakers

October 01, 2015
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Speaker Type:Base station   Speaker Impedance:8 ohms   RF Shielding:Yes   Speaker Audio Filters:Yes   Subwoofer Included:No   Volume Control:No   Tone… Read more

VHF

Vitai VT-5188

Vitai VT-5188

January 30, 2015
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  Vitai VT-5188 1. Frequency Range: VHF: 136-174MHz/245-245.9875Mhz                     UHF: 400-480MHz 2. Output Power: VHF: 10W/25W/60W        … Read more

App – Mobile

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AMSAT-NA will hold its 2017 Space Symposium October 27-29 at the Silver Legacy Resort in Reno, Nevada. The hotel offers free parking and airport shuttle, complimentary WiFi, and eight restaurants and retail shops. The 2017 AMSAT Space Symposium will feature numerous presentations on Amateur Radio satellites, operating techniques, news and plans from the Amateur Radio …

Articolo AMSAT-NA Heading to Reno this Fall for 2017 Space Symposium and Annual Meeting su Etere Blog.

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Every day is a good day to operate on CW, but set some time aside on New Year’s Eve and Day to enjoy Straight Key Night (SKN) or to do some CW on the satellites during AMSAT CW Activity Day.

The annual SKN gets under way at 0000 UTC on January 1, 2017 (New Year’s Eve in US time zones). The 24-hour event is not a contest but a day dedicated to celebrating Amateur Radio’s CW heritage. Participants are encouraged to get on the air and simply enjoy conversational CW contacts, preferably using a straight (hand) key or a semi-automatic key (bug).

Activity traditionally centers on CW segments in the HF bands. There are no points or obligatory exchange. The only requirement is just to have fun! Send a SKN list of stations worked and your vote for “Best Fist” and “Most Interesting QSO” by January 31, 2017.

AMSAT CW Activity Day — formerly Satellite Straight Key Night — takes place on January 1, 2017 (UTC) and run for 24 hours. As with the old Straight Key Night, this is a fun event, not a contest, and there is no required exchange. All forms of CW are welcome, from straight keys, bugs, and keyers to keyboards and decoders. Working the same station on more than one satellite is permitted.

All participants are asked to post their results, including any “Soapbox” comments, to AMSAT-BB. Include the satellites you used and the number of CW contacts you make on each. Participants may post their full logs, although this is not required.

Source:ARRL

Antenna

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$50SAT Goes Silent

$50SAT Goes Silent

September 03, 2015
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It appears that the $50SAT Amateur Radio “PocketQube” microsatellite — also known as Eagle 2 (MO-76) — has finally gone silent, a couple of days short… Read more

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Acom 2100 [ Video ]

Acom 2100 [ Video ]

August 16, 2016
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Easy to operate The TRI is a powerful tuning aid that, together with the automatically controlled input attenuator, helps the operator to quickly and… Read more

Bhutan DXpedition- A5

Bhutan DXpedition- A5

August 16, 2016
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Look for A52ARJ (JH3ARJ), A52LSS (JH3LSS), A52EQW (JH7EQW) and A52AEF(JH3AEF) to be active from Bhutan between August 22-27, 2016. QRV on 80-10m, CW/S… Read more

CY9C St Paul Island

CY9C St Paul Island

August 15, 2016
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“Be advised that we will operating from two sites over a mile distance from each other.   Most of the time we will have two stations operating on the… Read more

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The ARRL has honored veteran AMSAT personality and Amateur Radio digital pioneer Tom Clark, K3IO (ex-W3IWI), with its President’s Award. ARRL President Kay Craigie, N3KN, presented the award plaque to Clark at a January 10 meeting of the Potomac Valley Radio Club in Blacksburg, Virginia. The plaque, which bears a likeness of ARRL Co-Founder Hiram Percy Maxim, W1AW, recognizes Clark’s 60 years of advancing Amateur Radio technology.

“In addition to his work with AMSAT, Tom was a leader in the development of the AX.25 packet radio network in the 1980s, when he was W3IWI. Anyone who was on packet in the 1980s knew that call sign,” President Craigie said. “I recall attending a forum he gave on packet radio at a hamfest in Baltimore in the 1980s, when people on the East Coast were just getting interested in the mode and its possibilities.”

 

Clark was a TAPR director during the heyday of packet radio forwarding, and TAPR’s significance was huge, she said. “Before terminal node controllers were available on the commercial market, if you wanted to get on packet, you ordered a TNC kit from TAPR and assembled it. I still have my TAPR II TNC.”

Former AMSAT President and current AMSAT Director Bob McGwier, N4HY, was more direct. “There would be no AMSAT to inspire all of this work without Tom Clark,” he said, noting that the organization was in serious trouble after the Phase 3A satellite launch failure.

“Tom took over as president of AMSAT, and he saved the organization and inspired all of us to look to the future and aim for the stars,” McGwier said. “All that has followed, including PACSAT and microsats, CubeSats, AO-13, all the way through AO-85, are a direct result of Tom Clark saving AMSAT and providing it leadership as president from 1980 to 1987 and continuous leadership on the Board of Directors of AMSAT from 1976 until today.”

McGwier said it was Clark who convinced him in 1985 that the future lay in digital signal processing — DSP. “We started the TAPR/AMSAT DSP project, and it was announced in 1987,” he said. “We showed in our efforts that small stations with small antennas could bounce signals off the moon, and, using the power of DSP, we could see the signals in our computer displays.”

McGwier said this led to the SDX, the Software Defined Transponder, included in ARISSat and in AMSAT’s Phase 3E. McGwier said Clark was an early supporter of women in science, too.

“Tom is now and always will be a leader, mentor — the chief scientist for all of Amateur Radio,” he said.

Clark is an advisor to Virginia Tech as adjunct professor of aerospace and ocean engineering and of electrical and computer Engineering. McGwier said Clark will play a crucial role in the Phase 4B geosynchronous satellite opportunity on the USAF Wide Field of View spacecraft, in which Virginia Tech is a partner. 

Source:ARRL

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